01 May 2014

What Once Was Lost by Kim Vogel Sawyer - Audiobook Review by Carrie Fancett Pagels


What Once Was Lost by Kim Vogel Sawyer
Triple Power--Bibliotherapy, Audiobook, and Overall Novel (Kim's book will be included on my 2014 Best of List in December for ALL three components)

Amazing Story and Characters!  Kim Vogel Sawyer has hit a home run with this story. Continues to have her no nonsense but sweet voice, this has a solid believable story, and all the characters, even the minor ones, are well developed.

Heroine, Christina Willems, is left with a legacy of caring for others. But her shoulders cannot bear the weight all alone, despite her efforts to do so.  The author beautifully shows how God has to be trusted to provide. She's been running a poor farm with her father but now he has passed away.  But she is determined to continue caring for those in her charge. After the home is damaged she is able to place all the residents elsewhere except for a blind boy.

Levi Johnson has hidden off by himself for so long that his connections with others are almost nil. But when the mill owner is forced to take in a blind boy, he finds a part of himself that had gone missing. And as his heart softens, he makes room for Christina, too.

I listened to this book through Audible.com, as an audio download. I have a Platinum membership and will offer a credit for this book to one commenter who enjoys audiobooks if they would prefer this option for reading. Narration was excellent.

Bibliotherapy elements: Father's pocket watch is somewhat of a talisman for Christina and becomes an important item in the plot. Having one's faith tested. Fellowship with others. Coming back to the Lord.  All kinds of bibliotherapy elements. Also coping with unexpected pregnancy--one of the secondary characters, Cora, is dealing with the shame of unwed pregnancy. Hypocrisy in the church. Levi has the elements of not fully using his God-given talents. He also has to reconcile his feelings about his depressed father, who died a broken man. And the sweet blind boy at the core of the story becomes so competent under the tutelage of Levi that one begins to forget he was blind.


Skillfully told tale. Highly recommend! This book will be up for my 2014 Books of the Year for three categories: Book, audiobook, and bibliotherapy book.

Giveaway:We are giving away 2 copies of choice of Kim's books this week - Reader's choice of book and format including audiobook choice, as mentioned. (International winners ebook only or paperback if book is available through the Book Depository.) And a Starbuck's $10 gift card! "Like" Kim's Amazon Author page and put "AA" and answer this question to enter: Have you ever read a book about a poor house set in America? 

Here are a couple of other of Kim's new books:

                                                          
Kim's May 6th Release
Kim's January Release

33 comments:

  1. Wow, what a wonderful review, CARRIE, and such high praise for KIM'S new book! I remember reading the very first book Kim ever wrote and have been a fan ever since. Need to find time to slip this one in -- you and NOELA have certainly enticed us all to want to read it!

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    1. You simply have to read it, Diana, it is SO good!

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  2. The way KIM so skillfully developed not just one or two, but numerous characters so that you found yourself caring about them all, was just one of the things that stood out to me with this story CARRIE. I loved your glowing review btw Carrie and completely agree with your praise of this fabulous and very memorable book! :)

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    1. Yes, Kim was so skillful in how she wrote this book, Noela! I admire her talent!

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  3. I don't recall reading about a poor house in America. I know there was a poor farm not far from where I live--in the next county, but I don't know anything about it. It might make some interesting research.

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    1. I'd love to hear about it, Kay, and that was actually what I meant was the poor farm or a poor house. I think the city had the latter.

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  4. Thanks for your wonderful review of "What Once Was Lost", Carrie!!

    I'm thrilled to see that this book will be up for your 2014 Books of the Year for three categories - Kim's books are so inspirational and the characters so touching and realistic, the children always "get to me"!! I have a number of her books, and am working towards getting them all. It amazes me how some authors are able to write such wonderful books so quickly - Tracie Peterson is another example, over 100 books written - unbelievable!!

    The only book about a poor house set in America of which I'm aware is Kim's - I frequently heard expressions about going to the "Poor House" as I was growing up, without realizing it was an actual place. I was prompted to look up more info on it and in my mind, view it as a forerunner of some forms of government assistance now provided, such as low-income housing - except that in some time eras (ie: Victorian) and countries, poverty was seen as a "dishonorable" situation, "poorhouses" were also known as "workhouses" and could resemble a reformatory (often housing whole families) or giving manual work to the indigent and subjecting them to physical punishment. To me, this also appears to be a precursor to forms of slavery in the U.S.. The "Poor Farms" in the U.S. utilized the labor of it's residents in it's upkeep and raising the food they consumed, etc.. I read that Anne Sullivan, the teacher of Helen Keller, was raised on a Poor Farm.

    I never cared much for history when I was in school, however, reading the plots of Christian historical fiction novels has prompted me to "dig" into history on numerous occasions - I'm always grateful for further education, to say nothing of the inspiration the books have brought!!

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    1. Thanks, Bonnie! How interesting about Ann Sullivan! I heard that expression growing up, too!

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    2. BONNIE you always bless me with all the knowledge you share with us on OWG! Thanks for that great comment! :-)

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  5. "AA" Beautiful review about such a sensitive story, Carrie! I have read stories about poor houses, and also about poor orphanages. My senses for these unfortunates were heightened - perhaps that began my desire to adopt three children after I married. I remember visiting an orphanage as a child (school field trip) and begging my parents to adopt a little girl I met there. That didn't happen. When I thought I was incapable of conceiving - we adopted. Thereafter, God blessed me with my first pregnancy at the age of almost 40. Thank you for your inviting review to read Kim's book. Thank you for this giveaway and the chance to win a wonderful read.

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    1. How interesting, Barb, that God could use those stories and your experience to bring you your own three adopted children! Wow! Thanks for sharing!

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  6. AA, No I haven't read a book about a poor house in America.
    I too also read about Anne Frank and Helen Keller.
    I have done a lot of reading about families during the great depression.
    It didn't focus on a specific poor house though.
    Thank you for sharing Carrie!

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    1. Hi Cheryl! So great to see you here! My husband says I am supposed to say "you are welcome" for the thank you! I'm so blessed by our friends on the blog I feel like I should be the one thanking everyone who comes by. So thank you, too, Cheryl! Hope to see you soon!

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  7. Thank you so much for the kind review! You really blessed my heart.

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    1. You are very welcome, Kim. I'm glad you felt blessed but I doubt it was as much as I was blessed by reading this wonderful book. You were fortunate to have a great narrator, too! when you have a story this good, you hate to see it diminished by a poor narration. blessings!

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  8. I have never listend to a audio book of any book , only text to speech on my kindle fire. I bet is nice to hear a professional reading of a story. can't wait to see who wins.
    Blessings
    Linda Marie Finn
    Faithful Acres Books
    www.faithfulacres.net
    faithfulacresbooks@gmail.com

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    1. Linda, yes, I love listening to audiobooks! You should try it sometime! Praying for your husband. Hugs!

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  9. I have only ever read about poor houses in England. I imagine much would be the same, much different.

    AA

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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    1. Mary, I was doing a genealogy search and found two children by my maiden name and documented in one of the poor houses in England and I felt so sorry for those children. But who knows how that worked out. Didn't find them connected to my direct line nor who they were connected to but how sad!

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  10. AA
    No, I have not read about a poor house in America. I must admit that it sounds interesting and certainly not a common topic (at least I don't believe it's common)

    cindialtman(at)gmail(dot)com

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  11. CARRIE thanks for another awesome review! I don't think I have ever read a book about the poor house but I think I could write a book about living at MY poor house! ;-) lol Just kidding, GOD has provided for our family more times than I can count! I have added this book to my overflowing TBR stack!

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    1. Yes, you have to read this, T!!! It is so good. God does provide, like you said! Hugs!

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  12. Loved your review, Carrie. This surely sounds like a great book!

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    1. Marian, I wonder if there will be a Dutch version?

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  13. sharon Dianne KingMay 2, 2014 at 9:58 AM

    I would love to listen to any of your stories on Audio books..I really enjoying listening to stories/...God Bless

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  14. I love Kim's books! Another wonderful author!

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    1. I have a hard time listening to anything audio. My attention span wanders and I cannot focus on what's being said.

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  15. Very good review Carrie. I have heard of Poor Houses all of my life but haven't read a book about one yet' Hoping to win Kim's and reverse that statement.:) AA Please put my name in. It sounds very interesting and has to be with your opinion and the other OWG girls. ((Hugs)) coming. Maxie mac262(at)me(dot)com

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  16. Wonderful review!
    AA
    No, I have not read a book about a poor house set in America.
    Wendy
    wendyshoults(at)gmail(dot)com

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  17. Absolutely terrific review AA
    No I havent reag about poor houses but I live in an area with many poor people so can relate to what its about.
    God bless u
    Chris Granville
    granvilleATfrontiernetDOTnet

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  18. AA No I've never read a book that had that about a house that was poor. I would love to read this book.

    oh.hello.hiya@gmail.com

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