09 December 2012

Interview with Lynette Eason by Carrie Fancett Pagels

Lynette Eason
Lynette Eason

Lynette Eason is the author of WHEN A HEART STOPS, Book #2 of the Deadly Reunions series. Lynette has also written The Women of Justice series and writes for Harlequin’s Love Inspired line. She has written/contracted thirty two books, including a short e-book, since 2007.

Lynette, welcome to Overcoming With God.  We appreciate your willingness to share your testimony of overcoming with our readers. 
Thanks so much for having me.

Would you tell us about the most difficult thing in your life you have had to overcome, with God’s help? 
One of the most difficult things I’ve had to overcome is my sensitivity to my hearing loss. I wear hearing aids but still miss a lot of what people say. Or if someone is calling my name from behind, I won’t hear. Because my hair is long, it covers up the aids and people don’t notice them. 

Deafness is a very invisible handicapping condition. When you’re blind, you can wear sunglasses and carry a cane, or use a service dog. If you have mobility issues, you can use crutches or a wheelchair, etc. These are very visible tools that are signals to others. Hearing aids are so small, they can go unnoticed. 

At first, I was very self-conscious about it, but acted like I didn’t care. Thankfully, I’ve come to accept the hearing loss and not make a big deal out of it. It’s inconvenient and bothersome sometimes, and can be embarrassing when I don’t hear something, but I’ve learned to just say, “Hey, I wear hearing aids. If you want me to know what you’re saying, you’re going to have to use a little effort.” Some people can be rude about it, but 99% are not. They understand and they make the effort. And I appreciate it. I’ve also asked God to use the hearing loss in a way that will glorify Him. And I smile when it happens. 

What is your favorite bible verse and why? I have different favorite verses for different life situations, but I think my overall favorite is: Proverbs 3:5-6. “Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding.In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths.” I think the reason I love these verse so much is because I can rest assured that the Lord wants what’s best for me in life. No matter what happens, no matter what disappointments or discouragements that will come my way, I can trust in Him and lean on him and know that He’s going to take care of the details. I love that about Him.

When the Smoke Clears
Disability friendliness: Is this latest release available in audio format or do you have any other works available on audio?  Do your e-books have audio capability? Do you have any in large print?  
I know that a lot of my Love Inspired Suspense books are available in true large print format. I don’t believe any of the Revell books are and I know they’re not available in audio book format. I think if you have a kindle with text to speech ability, you can listen to the book that way.
When the Smoke Clears

What has been the most important thing you hope your readers will get from your books and why? The most important thing to me is knowing that God’s love is jumping off the page and into the readers’ hearts. I pray that my writing is a ministry to other, offering hope in the midst of trials.

As you researched your books, did you learn anything that particularly touched your heart? Well, a lot of my research grosses me out more than anything, but one thing I really loved about my research about law enforcement is how dedicated these people are to serving others. Even the ones who don’t profess to be Christians still have that desire to help others, to be there in times of trouble. Police, FBI, firemen and women, Paramedics, etc. They have something inside them that makes them special and I just appreciate each and every one of them.

Thank you, Lynette, for agreeing to answer these questions.  Have a blessed day and keep on writing!!

Thank you for having me, I appreciate it!


Purchase information: Buy Lynette's book at AmazonCBDBarnes & Noble and other bookstores.

Giveaway: One of Lynette's books, readers choice of book and format.  Comments in response to the following question will count as one entry.  

QUESTION:  Do you or a family member have a hearing loss and how have you coped?

68 comments:

  1. QUESTION: do you or a family member have a hearing loss and how have you coped?
    My Grandpa (whom I am very close too) lost all hearing in one ear when he was a child and he lost much of the hearing in the other ear over the years working in sawmills etc. We all learned when we were little to speak clearly and to speak a little louder but not too much or it would cause problems with his hearing aide but to be honest he has done so well, never letting it slow him down or stop him, that the rest of the family doesn't even think of it as an issue.

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    2. Hey Jasmine! Thanks for sharing! My FIL has hearing loss and wears a hearing aid but not all the time. My father had hearing loss late in life.

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  2. Thank you so much for being with us this week, LYNETTE! I am so anxious to hear more about your books this week, as I shamefully confess to not having read one yet.

    I don't have anyone in my family with major hearing loss, but I admire you, LYNETTE, for how you handle this issue in your life. My hubby has selective hearing, but that's a whole nuther subject! :)

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    1. I am glad Lynette was willing to share with us, Diana! I cannot believe that in the three years I have been blogging I have not had a guest share about this condition.

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  3. Jasmine, thanks for sharing your story. I hope you have a very Merry Christmas!

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  4. And I'm LOL, Diana. Yes, men tend to have a selective hearing loss and you're right, that's definitely a whole nuther subject. And I hope you'll get to read one of my books soon!
    God bless and Merry Christmas!

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  5. Yes a couple do I just talk louder !! lol Would love to win a copy PLEASE !! Thank you ,Dana Spille jashbk@earthlink.net

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    1. Dana, My husbands grandmother really lost her hearing and I don't think she could hear hardly anything but she would not get aids. So talking with her was really an issue. You had to sit right next to her.

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  6. One of my uncles had hearing loss, and wore a hearing aid. I knew he could read lips, so I would always face him and make eye contact, when I was talking to him.

    Lynette, I would imagine it takes extra concentration and energy to deal with a hearing loss. It seems like everything would be a bit more difficult.
    may_dayzee at yahoo dot com

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    1. Kay, you have been a two time winner here on OWG recently--please check your email!

      I had a deaf girl I worked with and I pray she is doing well now. She had to have an assistant with her. My ASL was not very good. I had learning finger spelling as a child.

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    2. Carrie, I sent you 2 email messages. Thank you.

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    3. Hi Kay, thanks for stopping by. Yes, I do have to concentrate a bit harder. And sometimes I still don't get it, but that's okay most of the time. I admit I'm much more comfortable in a room full of deaf people than I am hearing people!

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  7. I ♥ Lynette's books and had the privilege of her being the first author I interviewed on my blog! I can't wait to read this next book. Her writing skill keeps me glued to the edge of my seat and up until the wee hours of the morning with her stories :)

    Yes, to the hearing loss question. My brother is almost deaf and for years it was frustrating to talk to him on the phone but once he got his wears hearing aids conversation became easier. My father-in-law wears hearing aids too. We have to be careful that he is looking at us when we talk to him, and not all talk at once :)

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    1. I think those hearing aids can be tricky, too, Anne, because if you turn them up too high they can make horrible noises. That has to hurt your ears!

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  8. I would love to read your book. Sometimes it is hard to understand the why of things in our life but we know God has a plan. A friend couldn't hear and I learned some sign lanquage so I could communicate with her. I don't know a lot but knowing just the abc's to sign put a smile on her face. And it has helped me other times. I need to take a class to get better at it. I know the song Jesus Loves me! Thanks for letting me have the chance to win your book. God Bless You!
    joeym11@frontier.com

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    1. Bless you for taking classes to improve your proficiency!

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    2. Fingerspelling can sometimes be a lifeline to a deaf person. What a wonderful gift you gave your friend. :)

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  9. I have read several of Lynette's book and enjoy them so much! I have book one of this series but haven't had a chance to read it yet. I'd love to win book 2!!!

    As far as the question we just recently had a small scare with my oldest son. For several weeks he would wake up unable to hear from his right year. He's an amazing musician and his hearing is critical for that so I was a little freaked. Thankfully when he saw the doctor it wasn't anything major and he's hearing just fine now. Extremely grateful for that!

    Thanks for the interview and give away.

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  10. I love Lynette's books and have read the all - except this newest series. I just downloaded When the Smoke Clears to my Nook. I can't wait to read it.

    Lynette is correct about hearing loss being embarrassing. I have a frequency loss in one ear and it'sgrown increasingly worse over the last year. Often when in a group, I can hear very little of what is being said. Sometimes I hear something totally different than what was said. I'm trying to figure out how to compensate but so far I haven't. I think I'm going to have to get a hearing aid.

    Lynette, I really admire how you work this issue into some of your books. That is what first drew me to your LIS.

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    1. SUZIE, sorry to hear about the loss of your hearing. I can imagine that it must be very frustrating too. My dad had loss of hearing for a couple of weeks due to a bad cold. He was very frustrated and almost cancelled his vacation, because he couldn't hear well.

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    2. Aw, Marian, you're so sweet. Thank you. xoxo

      Luckily it's just one ear. If people look at me and aren't on the right side I get along except in crowded places.

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    3. Suzie, I know how you feel! I've worn hearing aids 20+ years now. The good thing is they keep getting better and better as far as sound quality goes. You'll have a good variety to choose from and probably be able to find one that is a good fit to your hearing loss. :) Good luck!

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    4. That's good to know, Lynette. I really appreciate it. I just wish I had thick and pretty long hair to cover it. :-)

      I have been actually trying to teach myself to read lips. It's hard and it will take a long time to learn.

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  11. LYNETTE thank you so much for sharing with us about your hearing loss. As a young girl my father had problems with his ears and he lost the hearing in one of them. But some days I promise he could hear out of that ear because if Mom and I were trying to whisper about something he could hear every word, but now if Gunsmoke or Bonanza was on it was a different story...he couldn't hear a thing. LOL I think talking louder to him made me have a "loud mouth" at least that's what I tell myself. lol I'm glad most people are kind when you ask them to speak up.

    I can't wait to read your books, I promise they are going at the top of my teetering TBR stack. :)

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    1. What you said about your dad hearing every word when you and your mom whispered sounds familiair. My mom and I also whispered in my grandmothers kitchen, but grandma heard every word when she was sitting in the living room. ;)
      My mom also has a loud voice...

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    2. LOL! It's crazy, I hear some things I wouldn't expect to and when I don't hear something I think I should, it's rather confounding. And just FYI, I love loud mouthed people!! Ha!

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  12. LYNETTE, thanks for being with us on the blog this week! I have enjoyed getting to know your books in the past year and I look forward to sharing two reviews of your books this week.

    Thanks for sharing about your hearing loss. I know it is hard to have a sort of handicap others can't see. I also deal with that. I have no hearing loss, but a joint problem. You can't see it on the outside and people often don't understand that I can't do everything other people can.

    My grandmother had loss of hearing and my mother and her sisters always talked very loud. Funny--or not--but my mother talked very loud to us too. We often had to ask her to lower her voice.

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    1. MARIAN, I'm really looking forward to reading your reviews on Lynette's books!!

      You and me both... and many others too, all have disabilities that no-one can see. And unfortunately it can be difficult for some people to understand without walking in someone's 'shoes'. But the comforting thing is that God understands when no-one else does.

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    2. It's good to know God understands when no-one else does. Thanks for the reminder, NOELA!

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    3. Hi Marian, thanks so much! I'm looking forward to reading the reviews. :) Yep, it's those invisible disabilities that can confuse people. :) God Bless.

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  13. Yes most of my husbands family is deaf of hard of hearing. When I joined the family my sister in law taught me sign language and they can read lips very well as long as you are looking at them. The doctor's thought our son was hard of hearing and had to have both of our kids tested and they tested just fine.

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    1. Thanks for sharing this with us MEGAN! Glad to hear your kids are fine.

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    2. Hi Megan, kudos for you for learning their language. It's fun, isn't it?

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  14. Lynette, my daughter lost the hearing in her right ear after a car accident when she was thirteen. It was difficult for her, learning how to cope when she was already dealing with being a teenager. And it was hard for me because I was driving when the wreck happened. Teachers in Carly's high school never quite understood how a person could become hearing impaired so quickly, nor did we know how exhausting it was for Carly to deal with it on a daily basis. One thing we learned was to give ourselves a break, that this wasn't something we were going to learn to deal with overnight.

    That was eight years ago. Carly is now an honor roll college student, active with work and Karate(where she teaches a class for hearing impaired children.)

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    1. PATTY, that really must have been hard for your daughter and you both! Glad to hear that she is doing so well now.

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    2. Hey Patty, wow, I can't imagine dealing with it at 13 as a result of an accident. What wonderful parents she has to help her through it! Thanks for sharing your story. :) Hugs to you!

      Lynette

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  15. Hi Lynette, many of my relatives on my Mother's side of the family are now wearing hearing aids, once my mother got one I knew my turn would come soon enough. Now when I have started repeatedly asking people "what did you say" I know my time is near, frustrating to say the least, but I'll take it as it comes and will hope my family will have patience with me as I had to have with my Mom. We did have many a good laugh about "what" she heard and what we really said.

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    1. Hi... is this from MAXIE also? If not, hit Reply and leave your name and email! Thanks.
      I can completely understand about it being frustrating and sympathize with you! It is good that they have hearing aids available to help though isn't it? I'm sure you will reap patience just as you have given it to your mum!

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  16. My middle daughter has trouble hearing on her right side. She went to at least 2 doctors in the past and they didn't seem interested in helping her.She asked them about putting a tube in her ear and they said she didn't need that. She misses a lot if you are on that side and tells us to remember she can't hear good on that side. She had a hard time getting the kids to get on her left side or touch her to get her attention. I sometimes forget too. I would like to win one of your books. Thanks Carrie.
    Maxie ( mac262@me.com )

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    1. Thanks for stopping by to share MAXIE! I imagine it would be very difficult for people to remember the 'good side' when talking or to get attention first. I'm sure in time and with patience, her kids and others will remember more.
      Good luck in the draw!

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    2. It is hard for people to remember to talk on one side. I have a "better" side. My left side, but it's still bad enough I'm not sure it makes a difference what side people talk on. Talk to me face to face and let me read your lips. Ha. :)

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  17. My grandfather had a really bad hearing loss and even though he wore a hearing aid, you still had to speak quite loud. I have a little bit of hearing loss due to a virus in one ear, so sometimes it's hard to hear certain levels. Your book sounds wonderful! shopgirl152nykiki(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. VERONICA, thank you for sharing! As with yourself, my mother and siblings also had to talk really loud for my dad to be able to hear. I often felt for my mum when she had to do that when out shopping... especially for certain things she had to say! :) Sorry to hear about your small hearing loss... but even a little loss can make a difference in your life.

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  18. My husband has partial hearing loss. He doesn't ever hesitate to tell someone he has a loss when they're talking to him and he's only getting part of the conversation. We use humor rather than being sad about our disabilities at home. Such as we'll be listening to something together and all of sudden he'll get a horrified look on his face. He's misheard and was appalled at what he thought he heard. (We intentionally never listen to anything that would appall us.) Then both chuckle about what a difference just a couple of words can make. As you say most people are kind about this and that helps a lot. We both have brain damage (dementia) and folks often aren't so kind about that. Enjoyed reading your interview and am looking forward to reading your works. I'm a regular monthly suscriber to the love inspired suspense series and enjoy them immensely. Also appreciate the large print version. Blessings, Susan Fryman susanngarrylee@yahoo.com

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    1. Hi SUSAN, thanks so much for stopping by and sharing! What a great, positive attitude to use humour instead of being sad with the disabilities in your lives. I do find it a little sad that more people can't be more understanding to such sweet people as yourselves in regards to dementia. God bless you Susan!
      Happy reading - the Love Inspired series are very often an interesting and enjoyable read!

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    2. Hi Susan, yes, humor is the best way to approach it. So glad you enjoy the books. :) God bless!

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  19. Great to have you here on OWG and read your interview LYNETTE! I own and have read 'When the Smoke Clears' and one of your Love Inspired books 'Black Sheep Redemption'. Both great stories!

    My dad was partially deaf for half of his adult life, but toward the end of his days he was completely deaf. When we visited him at the Nursing Home, I would either use a notepad or take along my iPad and use a kids drawing/writing app to write words or draw funny pictures (I say funny, because I can't draw lol) to make him laugh and to communicate a little with him. He could barely talk toward the end, couldn't walk because of an amputation, and also had Alzeimher's, and I can't tell you how thoroughly rewarding it was to make him smile or see a tear in his eye when I'd tell him I loved him.

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    1. That gives me tears in my eyes, NOELA!

      Can you draw something funny for me for my birthday? :)

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    2. LOL Marian! Maaaybee... but I would only do that for your birthday... and you would have to sign something or other first that it would never make it online!! ;D

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    3. My birthday is on January 4, so you better start drawing. ;) And I promise - and if necessary I will sign it - that it would never make it online. :D

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    4. Oh, that is so sweet, Noela. My bday is Jan 5th so feel free to draw a card for me, too, lol! My hubby has to write me messages for special days--I don't let him buy store bought cards.

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    5. That is one of the sweetest things I've ever heard, Noela. It brought tears to my eyes, too. This is one of the greatest examples of why continuing evolving technology is a good thing. (I get so tired of defending it to certain people,.)

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    6. NOELA I'm so sorry your dad had to go through all of that but I know he was grateful to have his beautiful daughter to visit him and take time to communicate with him. You my sissy are a priceless treasure and I am so glad God sent you my way. I won't ask for a picture BBUUUTTT if you are drawing one for Marian and Carrie... :D I can't even draw stick people without them being crooked. :)

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    7. You're a very sweet daughter Noela! I'm so glad your dad was blessed with you. :) Thanks for sharing.

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  20. It seems like as we age both my hubby and I are developing some hearing loss. I have noticed that we have to start turning up the TV to make it louder to hear and at times have to ask people to repeat what they are saying.

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    1. Jo, I blew an eardrum two years ago when I was severely ill with ongoing infections and whooping cough. I still don't have the full hearing back in that ear but when I had the testing done it was considered within normal limits for someone my age.

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  21. Hey, Carrie and Lynette, LOVE the interview and my heart goes out to Lynette regarding her hearing loss because it truly does eat away at your confidence and ability to understand things.

    I never realized how much until the last year when I've been experiencing the same thing. According to a recent hearing test, I have more hearing loss than warranted for a woman "my age" even though I am at that age in life when it's likely to happen -- uh, downright OLD (physically, that is. Mentally and emotionally? I'm a juvenile delinquent ...). Consequently, I have been "trying out" hearing aids for the last month and I can honestly say NOTHING has made me feel older than wearing these silly things, but it's far more debilitating to my confidence to miss out on a good chunk of what people are saying, so I'm getting used to them. Oh, joy -- now I squeal just like Aunt Julie used to when I used to hug her!!

    Hugs,
    Julie

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    1. Julie, I know when I couldn't hear out of my right ear, after I blew the eardrum, I felt rather lost. I feared I'd never get my hearing back. Although I have a slight loss in that ear even now (I can't hear birds singing through the windows for instance though I can with the left) they say it is normal for my age. Which makes me think my peers are missing out on a lot! I have some difficulty when people speak to me on my right side and I have to turn my head. So I am thinking my day is coming, too. Thank God we have the technology today to handle hearing loss!

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  22. Julie! You make me laugh. Once you get used to the hearing aids, you actually can forget they're there. LOL. The only time I really think about it is when I'm at a conference and can't understand what people are saying because of all the background noise. But it is what it is and I'm grateful that God gave someone the brains to come up with the technology! Hang in there!

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    1. Lynette, I have those problems already, now, but I guess it is an auditory discrimination problem--background noise just fogs over what people are saying. Also, with people with sensory issues, like kids with Asperger's, a lot of times they become so overwhelmed by the noise overstim that they cannot hear what is being said. My son came home from church crying yesterday because of the loud noise during their prayer worship.

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  23. My dad struggles with his hearing, though he refuses to get a hearing test. lol We try to remember to talk slowly (fast talking trips him up the worst)and clearly. He'll let you know if you don't get it right! :-) By the way, I read "When the Smoke Clears" and thoroughly enjoyed it! I've also your "Women of Justice" series and loved them, too. Keep up the good work!!

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  24. Wow, great interview Lynette and Carrie! Lynette, I've heard about your books in the blogging community (and I'm a facebook fan) so I was thrilled to see your interview here, it's such a pleasure getting to know you :)

    Thanks for sharing about your hearing loss, I fully believe that dealing with this as you have makes your testimony stronger. I will definitely add you to my prayers, you have already greatly inspired me with this interview :) Do you know sign language?

    I have been blessed not to have any loved ones with hearing loss. I definitely agree that when in a room communicating with anyone who has hearing loss to try harder to talk with them. I liked Noela's method of writing down her comments :)

    Lynette: I also loved the message you want your readers to take from your books (God's love jumping off the page), it always means a lot to me when authors not just entertain but also put messages of faith in their stories.

    Good job to Noela, Marian, and Carrie for responding to everyone's comments....there is always such GREAT teamwork on this blog :) Thanks for the giveaway, ladies! Hugs and blessings all around, please keep writing those great books Lynette!

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  25. Thanks Kara! Yes, we are a team! I am so grateful for Noela and Marian helping out. We are all on different time zones!

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  26. I'm so glad I saw this posted on the forum. My sister was born with a 95% hearing loss and she was about 4 when we discovered it. My parents elected to mainstream her rather than send her to a school for the deaf. She now has very strong hearing aids and reads lips really well (can you see a mystery coming up with her as the heroine?) She can even take dictation!
    Great post Carrie and Lynette. And I love your books, Lynette!

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    1. Pat, great to see an MBT buddy here! Wow, she was four, yikes! What a blessing that she was kept at home and can read lips so well too. Heck I can't take dictation, lol! Yes, she needs to be one of your heroines!!! blessings!

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  27. Wonderful interview, Carrie. I love these medical suspense books! Our family has been blessed by not having any serious hearing losses. My husband tells me I mumble, and I'm wondering if old age is creaping up on him, but it's nothing significant. I would find it very difficult to suffer hearing loss due to problems with poor balance, and I'm afraid that without hearing I would have more problems with my equilibrium. Thanks for such an interesting interview and giveaway!
    Nancee
    quiltcat26[at]sbcglobal[dot]net

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